top of page

Securing Justice: Connect with Those Impacted by AFFF Exposure

SignedRetainers.com equips mass tort attorneys with signed retainers for their practices, transforming legal leads into concrete engagements. Our platform is designed to convert legal calls into actionable signed cases, empowering your pursuit of justice.

DALL·E 2024-03-28 18.38.59 - Illustrate a poignant scene that clearly shows firefighters i

The ongoing Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) case involves numerous lawsuits against manufacturers of a firefighting foam linked to cancer diagnoses. This foam, used for decades to extinguish petroleum-based fires, contains per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), also known as "forever chemicals" due to their persistence in the environment and the human body. These substances have been linked to a variety of cancers and other health issues.


The litigation has seen a substantial increase in plaintiffs, with claims consolidated in a Multidistrict Litigation (MDL) in South Carolina. As of March 2024, over 7,170 lawsuits were pending, with plaintiffs including individuals across multiple states and water supply companies seeking compensation for the filtration of these chemicals from drinking water. The first bellwether trial began in June 2023, involving water supply companies and the City of Stuart, Florida, against 3M, among others, over contamination claims【5†source】

【6†source】【7†source】.


Individuals eligible to file an AFFF lawsuit include firefighters (both civilian and military), military personnel, airport workers, oil rig workers, and chemical plant workers, particularly those who have worked with the foam over many years and may have developed serious health complications as a result. The health conditions named in these lawsuits range from various cancers to immune system damage and thyroid disease. There is ongoing legal action and significant public interest in the outcomes of these trials, given the widespread use of AFFF and the serious implications of PFAS exposure【7†source】.

bottom of page